Popular pharma products of GSK and Macleods face counterfeiting

Lately, India’s leading drug authority flagged almost 35 batches of medicines, including popular skin medication cream brands Betnovate and Panderm as they failed quality tests conducted last month. At the same time, companies that market these products in India said that the samples tested by the regulator were fake versions of their famous brands

Earlier this month, the Central Drugs Standard Organisation had marked specific batches of Betnovate C, Betnovate N & Panderm ++ failing in quality standards. According to the authority, the samples failed in tests conducted to determine their ingredients. The regulator also found that a batch of acidity drug Lupizole also failed in the tests.

While conducting the tests, CDSCO had identified batch number NG980 of Betnovate C cream for failing in identification tests along with tests of ‘assay’ of clioquinol- which means that the cream had fewer quantities of this ingredient. The batch number of EZ277 of Betnovate-N also failed in the identification test, whereas samples of Panderm ++ batch number PCF901A and Lupizole batch number T9004141 were declared substandard by the authority.

While commenting on the issue a spokesperson from GlaxoSmithKline which markets the product in India said that the two batches of Betnovate-N and Betnovate-C seized by Delhi Drug Control are counterfeits. He further added that the two batches were marked counterfeit by the company and the authority, after testing them at government labs and retesting at GSK sites. Meanwhile, GSK is coordinating with the regulator and providing its full support in the matter.

Macleods, which markets Panderm ++, has already filed a complaint with the drug regulator and Delhi Police over counterfeits of its skin treatment cream. A representative from the company said that the batch number listed by CDSCO is not correct and does not abide by the coding practices of Macleods Sikkim facility. Moreover, the details mentioned on the label are inaccurate which identifies the product as a counterfeit. Macleods had filed a complaint with the FDA and the Delhi Police in the month of August and September while an FIR has already been registered for the impugned counterfeit Panderm ++. Emailed queries to Lupin Ltd, which markets Lupizole in India, remained unanswered by press time Saturday.

Some quick facts:

  • In October 2019, Betnovate-C was the largest brand in the over Rs 210 crore betamethasone + clioquinol combination market, while Betnovate-N was the largest in the nearly Rs 195 crore betamethasone + neomycin combination market.
  • In October 2019, Betnovate-C was the largest brand in the over Rs 210 crore betamethasone + clioquinol combination market.
  • In October 2019, Betnovate-N was the largest in the nearly Rs 195 crore betamethasone + neomycin combination market.
  • According to AIOCD and PharmaTrac, Betnovate-C and Betnovate-C captured 100 percent and 98.78 percent of these markets.
  • Panderm ++ is also the top brand in its segment, capturing over 40 percent of the Rs 122.70 crore clobetasol + neomycin + miconazole combination market in October.

Source: Indianexpress.com

 

The impact of counterfeiting on the common man

Many people don’t take the crime of counterfeiting seriously, they think that counterfeiting will not impact their lives, however, the fact is that counterfeiting has many negative impacts on the common man and thus has been named as the ‘Crime of the 21st century by Federal Bureau of Investigation.

On the global scale, the value of counterfeiting has reached a high of approximately 1 trillion dollars whereas, in India, the figure has shot up to I lakh crore annually. These figures clearly show the grim scenario of the situation.

Counterfeiting not only impacts the global economy but is a challenge for the governments, business organizations and most importantly the consumers. Counterfeiting not just dupes the consumer of his hard-earned money but also affects his health, besides this, there are many far-reaching impacts of counterfeiting on consumers. Let’s discuss the same.

Negatively affects the consumer’s health: What could be more dangerous than a counterfeit life-saving drug. Counterfeit medicines have created havoc in the industry, and it has become increasingly difficult to control them. Counterfeit or substandard medicines can have serious side effects on the human body and in some cases can even lead to death.

Dupes the consumer financially: Consumers who unknowingly purchase fake goods have to pay an actual price for a counterfeit. While it may sound good to purchase an original product at high prices but for a counterfeit, it is not at all good in any sense as you have compromise on quality.

Creates unemployment: There is a clear link between the rise of counterfeiting and the rise in unemployment. The business of counterfeits leads to monetary losses for the manufacturers which in turn affects the expenditure on current and future employees.

Poor infrastructure: Today’s common man needs beyond ‘roti, kapda, and makaan’. The government spends a good amount of money every year on rural and urban infrastructure. This money is collected from the taxes levied by the government on the business organizations and the common man. Since counterfeits evade taxes it leads to a drop-down in the money spent on infrastructure and development.

The use of integrated anti-counterfeiting technology against fake products

The value of global counterfeiting has reached to trillions of dollars. Not just developed nations but also the developing countries are facing the problem of fake products. Counterfeiting leaves a negative impact on the government exchequer, company’s profits and the consumers. In the past few years, government authorities and companies are taking stringent measures against counterfeiting.

E-commerce giants like Amazon and Alibaba have initiated anti-counterfeiting measures to deter counterfeiters from selling fake products on their platforms. Governments across the world have also implemented strict laws to deal with counterfeiters and their chain of networks. We regularly come across news from different parts of the world about the seizure of counterfeit or fake products by authorities.

The growth of counterfeiting has drastically changed the use and implementation of different anti-counterfeiting technologies. As forgers and counterfeiters use more sophisticated technology to copy the product and its packaging, it has become imperative to use new measures against them.

The integration of different anti-counterfeiting technologies is gaining immense popularity amongst manufacturers and other stakeholders of the supply chain. The fusion of holography along with digital authentication has made products highly secure against the threat of duplication. Holostik is a renowned name in the field of anti-counterfeiting technologies.

We believe in constant R&D and innovation to stay ahead of counterfeiters. Our smart security holograms and security labels are the perfect examples of integrated anti-counterfeiting solutions. In these anti-counterfeiting products, we have collated the efficacy of OVD with the prowess of QR/bar code.

Acting as a double-edged sword against counterfeiting our integrated solutions provides a two-level of authentication, making it highly impossible to replicate our features. Today, we are providing a wide range of anti-counterfeiting products and solutions to more than 10,000 clients in 75+ countries. If you want your products to remain safe from the problem of counterfeiting then call us on +91–785-785-7000 or mail us at connect@holostik.com.

Casio initiates a major drive against fake products

Global electronics giant Casio has started an anti-counterfeit drive by which the company is seizing duplicate products across the country. The company is taking such measures to control the market of fake watches and calculators. Casio is also taking legal action against importers, wholesalers, and retailers dealing in counterfeit items. From the start of June, the company has conducted many raids around the country with the help of local police.

Raids have been conducted on wholesalers and retailers dealing with counterfeit products in cities like New Delhi, Mumbai, Bengaluru, Coimbatore, Chennai, Kolkata, Vadodara, and Bhopal. During the raids, large quantities of counterfeit Casio watches and calculators were confiscated by the authorities.

Through this step, the company has been successful in passing on a strong message and creating a deterrent amongst the infringers of its brand and intellectual property rights. With the anti-counterfeit move, Casio has conveyed a strong message against infringers of its brand and intellectual property rights.

A senior police officer in Delhi said: “We had received a complaint from the company following which a drive was initiated in the city. We have recovered several hundreds of fake watches and calculators. More than a dozen people have been arrested in this regard and a case under relevant sections was registered.”

Casio has also initiated legal action against Snapdeal for sale of counterfeit calculators and watches on its online platform. In this matter, a Delhi court has granted an ad-interim ex-parte injunction order in favour of Casio, restraining Snapdeal inter alia from selling, displaying and advertising goods bearing the trademarks of Casio. The company has said that seizure through customs is one of the most effective ways of fighting counterfeit products. As part of its anti-counterfeit drive, the company has been actively training Indian Customs personnel across the country on how to identify fake products. Indian Customs personnel have been successful in seizing large quantities of fake Casio watches imported from China.

Source: Outlook India

How product packaging can be made impeccable in context of security

Product packaging is an important step in ensuring maximum safety of products from tampering, theft and other forms of counterfeit. A coordinated and secure packaging framework coupled with a reliable track-and-trace system is key in supply chain security.

In a world of digitalized logistics and e-commerce, the physical security of products is no longer a supplementary layer of protection but a necessity.

Counterfeiters today operate on a larger scale than ever before, with entire factories featuring advanced technology focused on creating perfect copies of products provided by well-known brands or manufacturers. Trusting the entire supply chain security to a supposedly strong legal framework and the precaution of consumers is simply not a good strategy.

A sound supply chain security strategy would involve a proactive approach in implementing technology that allows manufacturers to track their products throughout their distribution chains and a packaging system that makes it impossible for counterfeiters to tamper with the products or replace them with cheap knockoffs within the legitimate supply chain.

Authentication solutions

Authentication in packaging is usually achieved with sealing and holograms. Depending on the level of security required, sealing and holograms could have advanced security features such as pressure-sensitivity, customized tamper-evident fracture patterns, a blacklight verification system, and machine-readable entrenched code.

These are sometimes heat-sealable and may be applied directly to product containers using induction seal technology, making it tamper-proof. Multiple films may be applied to form a single holographic seal that provides a high level of defense to containers or bottles.

Nano-optical technology

The use of nanotechnology in product packaging highly elevates the unlikelihood of counterfeit interference and solves the many limitations associated with synthetic packaging techniques.

Managed microstructures and nanostructures on technologies such as holograms offer features such as water resistance, heat stability and tamper-indicative change of color that cannot be reversed.

Tamper-evident packaging systems

Tamper-evident packaging systems may include solutions like wide-web films, holographic shrink sleeves, and security pouches. The tamper evidence feature maintains product integrity by preventing repacking or reselling of the items.

Figure: Example of a shrink sleeve

Shrink sleeves are a leading packaging application in industries such as food and beverages, cosmetics and detergents. These are heat-sealable and conform to the shape of containers making it harder to tamper with. Tamper-evident shrink sleeves come with microstructure holographic authentication for advanced security.

Figure: Example of a wide web film

A wide web film is a holographic film with a characteristic design covered securely around a product or product container. To open the container and remove the product, the film must be cut or torn.

These holographic laminated films offer a completely non-invasive solution to prevent any sort of tampering and are used extensively for flexible packaging. These films vary in thickness and may come in PET (12 microns) or BOPP (20 microns).

Security pouches provide external tamper evidence and can be combined with the internal seals for double security. These usually involve rotogravure printing technology and the highest level of optical security features.

Tamper-evident packaging systems take the high-security value of nano-optical and holographic authentication solutions and combine it with high-quality printing and materials for a secure and appealing protection solution that increases product security and enhances the brand value.

For more on shrink sleeves, security pouches and wide web films, click here. To find the ideal product packaging solution for your business, click here.

Counterfeit Peppa Pig items seized by Economic Offence Wing in Mumbai

In order to fight fake products and stop the illegal use of its Intellectual Property (IP), Viacom18 Media Pvt. Ltd. Joined hands with the Economic Offence Wing of Mumbai Police to conduct raids on businesses dealing counterfeit products of its brand Peppa Pig. A big number of counterfeit products were seized during the raids.

Anil Lale, General counsel, Viacom18 said that the Govt. of Indian has seriously taken up the issue of piracy and illegitimate use of IP over the past few years. We are proud to work with public agencies like the Department of Industrial Policy& Promotion, Maharashtra Cyber Crime Cell and Mumbai Police’s EOW in the fight against counterfeiting.

He also said that it is important to admit that the sale and purchase of fake products are serious offences as piracy and diminishes the brand’s royalty. As rightful IP rights owners, we feel it is our duty to the customers that they may not receive fake products.

Tim Pfeiffer, SVP Business Affairs, Family & Brands, Entertainment One said that eOne believes in taking vibrant brands from screens to stores and it is very encouraging to see our international partners and authorities undertake efforts that ensure only real products reach our young audience. Counterfeit merchandise is not only against the licensor’s interest but also has a colossal impact on the safety and health of the user due to the absence of quality standards.”

The Economic Offenses Wing has been fighting against counterfeit products. In the last few years, they have been able to dismantle businesses which deal in the trade of counterfeit products.

Source: Exchange4media.com

CropLife India conducts workshop on counterfeit pesticides

CropLife India recently organized a workshop for pesticide dealers at Vadodara. The workshop was organized with the help of Kruti Charitable Trust. The workshop was attended by pesticide dealers from Vadodara and Bharuch districts who discussed the rising problem of counterfeit, spurious, substandard and unregistered/unlicensed pesticides.

The key officials present at the event were Jatinbhai Patel, Agriculture – Extension Officer; Hiranbhai Patel, Secretary, Central Gujarat Dealers’ Association and Mukeshbhai Raj, President, Dealers’ Association, Karjan.

Asitava Sen, Chief Executive Officer, CropLife India while speaking at the event said, “CropLife India will continue its fight against duplicate and illegal pesticides. The products are unable to kill the pests and are harmful to the crops and the environment. Dealers play an important role in the supply chain as they can ensure that farmers receive only genuine pesticides.”

The workshop focused on the various ways of detecting counterfeit, spurious, substandard and unregistered/unlicensed pesticides. The dealers shared the challenges they have to face while company representatives shared their perspective on probing the source of pesticides. Educating farmers became an important part of the entire discussion.

The workshop also focused on different ways of detecting fake, spurious, substandard and unlicensed pesticides. The dealers shred their challenges which they face regularly whereas company representatives discussed their views on determining the source of fake pesticides. The workshop helped the dealers on different procedures and aspects of avoiding fake products.

CropLife India has an ongoing anti-counterfeit mass awareness campaign in the villages of Amod, Bharuch, Karjan and Padara districts of Gujarat. CropLife India has tied up with Kruti Charitable Trust for this campaign who would reach out to 175 villages across the district for raising awareness on fake, spurious, substandard and unregistered/unlicensed pesticides.

Until now CropLife has organized rallies, puppet shows, video shows, messaging through loudspeakers for creating awareness among people regarding spurious and illegal products.

Source: NewsVoir

The negative effects of counterfeiting on the economy

Counterfeiting is a trillion-dollar illegal business having its presence in almost every part of the world. Today, counterfeiting is posing a threat to not just the consumers but also to the economic growth of the nations.

According to an OECD and EUIPO report, “Global sales of counterfeit and pirated goods have soared to 460 billion euros ($522 billion) a year, amounting to a whopping 3.3 per cent of world trade.”

The report also states the nations most affected by counterfeiting which includes the United States, Japan, South Korea and the EU states. However, the effects of counterfeiting are not just visible in developed countries but are also hampering the growth of the developing world.

Let’s discuss some of the impacts of counterfeiting on the economy of a country:

Evasion of taxes: Counterfeiting leads to evasion of taxes. The mammoth counterfeiting industry sells its products in the market without paying taxes to the government. This leads to a loss of the government exchequer and finally, the government is not able to spend enough on welfare projects and schemes.

Rise in unemployment: Since the counterfeit industry takes away the profits of credible companies, they are not able to recruit new employees. The financial instability of the industries creates massive unemployment which is linked indirectly to the problem of counterfeiting.

Diminishes foreign investment: It has been generally seen that countries with weak IP laws and poor regulatory measures become the breeding ground for counterfeit activities. Such countries blur their chances of foreign investments. Counterfeiting diminishes the chances of foreign direct investments and thus block the economic growth of a country.

Fuels other black-market activities: Counterfeiting fuels other black-market activities and is a lucrative business for organized criminals. With the money acquired from the sale of counterfeits, they fund their vast network, which is involved in drugs trafficking, human trafficking, illegal arms, prostitution etc.

Finally, we can conclude that counterfeiting has multiple negative effects, which are very harmful to the economic growth of the country if not checked on time by authorities and the respective governments of their countries.

To get the best anti-duplication and products and solutions call us on +91–785-785-7000 or mail us at connect@holostik.com.

Large stock of illicit cigarettes and cash seized by authorities in Bristol,UK

Of late, (HMRC) Her Majesty’s Revenue Customs has confiscated approximately 500000 suspected illicit cigarettes and around 700kg of hand-rolled tobacco in Bristol. Officers from HMRC searched four residential addresses and two business premises on June 12 as a part of an investigation into cigarette and tobacco smuggling.

A spokesperson from HMRC said that £80,000 in cash was seized by the authorities. Five men and woman were also arrested on suspicion of falsely evading excise duty., A woman was also arrested on suspicion of money laundering and another man arrested on suspicion of illegally evading excise duty.

Illicit white cigarettes have no legal market in the UK. These cigarettes are mass manufactured in factories in Russia and the East and are imported illegally to the UK. No duty is paid on these cigarettes and health warnings are also missing.

On the other hand, counterfeit cigarettes are illegally manufactured and sold by a party other than the original trademark or copyright holder. Counterfeit hand-rolling tobacco is like cigarettes which are illegally manufactured and sold by a party other than the original trademark or copyright owner.

Source: bristolpost.co.uk

Counterfeits are losing sales and business in UAE

The number of counterfeit items has dropped down after Khaleej Times took a joint initiative against the presence of counterfeit goods at different locations like a raid on Karama shops.

Abdul, 40 who owns a shop for ladies’ bags and purses in Karama said that that he has faced a setback in his business. Earlier when he had opened the shop, he used to make Dh2,000 but now he makes only Dh100. Sometimes he is not able to sell a single item.

This is the third time he had opened a shop in Karama. Five years ago, the authorities had fined him Dh50,000 during a crackdown against fake products.

“After paying that hefty fine with great difficulty, I closed down my shop and went back to India for a few years.”

He further said that after paying the big fine he closed down his shop and went back to India. On the rising issue of fakes, he says, “Many years ago people used to display fake items at the counter but now they are hidden underground or inside secret basements. Many tourists still come to buy fake products they do not mind buying a copy.

Ahmad Almheiri, senior manager of the business protection department at the DED, said: “If they are selling in a secret apartment, it means they know that the DED is always in the market and that it’s hard to sell counterfeits in Dubai.”

Source: Khaleej Times