Counterfeit Peppa Pig items seized by Economic Offence Wing in Mumbai

In order to fight fake products and stop the illegal use of its Intellectual Property (IP), Viacom18 Media Pvt. Ltd. Joined hands with the Economic Offence Wing of Mumbai Police to conduct raids on businesses dealing counterfeit products of its brand Peppa Pig. A big number of counterfeit products were seized during the raids.

Anil Lale, General counsel, Viacom18 said that the Govt. of Indian has seriously taken up the issue of piracy and illegitimate use of IP over the past few years. We are proud to work with public agencies like the Department of Industrial Policy& Promotion, Maharashtra Cyber Crime Cell and Mumbai Police’s EOW in the fight against counterfeiting.

He also said that it is important to admit that the sale and purchase of fake products are serious offences as piracy and diminishes the brand’s royalty. As rightful IP rights owners, we feel it is our duty to the customers that they may not receive fake products.

Tim Pfeiffer, SVP Business Affairs, Family & Brands, Entertainment One said that eOne believes in taking vibrant brands from screens to stores and it is very encouraging to see our international partners and authorities undertake efforts that ensure only real products reach our young audience. Counterfeit merchandise is not only against the licensor’s interest but also has a colossal impact on the safety and health of the user due to the absence of quality standards.”

The Economic Offenses Wing has been fighting against counterfeit products. In the last few years, they have been able to dismantle businesses which deal in the trade of counterfeit products.

Source: Exchange4media.com

Fake currency mastermind caught in Prakasam district, Andhra Pradesh

Recently, Police nabbed a government employee from his residence in Chirala town or Prakasam for allegedly printing and circulating counterfeit notes.

The accused has been identified as David Raju who is a junior assistant at Chirala RTC depot. Recently two vendors were arrested for possessing fake currency with a value of around Rs 3 lakhs. However, cops said that they did not print the cash and were only circulating them.

After further investigation, they revealed that they did not print the cash and were only circulating them. Based on the information provided by the two it was found that Raju was behind the whole racket. Fake currency worth Rs 13 lakh was confiscated from Raju with the equipment used for printing.

Raju was mostly printing notes of Rs 100 or Rs 50 and slipped the notes between the two original notes so as to avoid suspicion. Later he sold fake currency worth Rs 3 lakh for Rs 30,000. As per officials, Raju has been sent to judicial custody.

Source: TOI

New invisible nano ink may help in preventing counterfeiting

Duplicating and counterfeiting of goods is a growing problem across the world. Different anti-counterfeiting measures like printing barcodes or holograms can prevent counterfeiting of products.

Now nanotechnology may provide a solution to get rid of the menace of counterfeiting. The technology depends on the changes that happen in nanoparticles when subjected to certain conditions. These changes can be easily identified but the technology is difficult to copy or replicate.

Recently, researchers at the Advanced Polymer and Nanomaterial Laboratory (APNL) Tezpur University have developed a new, light emitting nanocomposite-based ink that is not visible under light but can be detected when kept under an ultra-violet light. The ink is quite useful in preventing counterfeiting on paper and plastic.

Niranjan Karak, Group Leader of APNL said, “The nanocomposite has an intricate structure to prevent imitation. By dispersing it in organic solvents like xylene, it transforms into an ink that can be used to mark a label. The liquid appears pale-yellow under visible light and glows with a cyan tint when exposed to UV light of specific length.”

The performance of the ink was tested by writing a few letters on paper and plastic. It was found that the letters were not visible in daylight, whereas when kept under UV light, it glowed with a cyan hue.

For convenience the ink can be loaded into the refill of a sketch or gel pen and has a shelf life of up to ten years and degrades in a few months only under the action of soil microbes.

Source: thehindubusinessline

Cosmetic products in UK are the most counterfeited goods

According to a recent survey by global investigation firm Kroll, perfume and cosmetic products are the most counterfeited goods in the UK. The report states that cosmetic or beauty products were the sixth most counterfeited products after toys, chargers, clothing, bags and sports shoes.

The firm stated that duplicate consumer products are a growing part of the global economy and pose a risk to the economy and consumers. The outcomes of the counterfeit goods are dangerous and have many negative effects.

Benedict Hamilton, Managing Director at Kroll said, “We have seen how the counterfeiting of seemingly harmless clothing items such as jeans and t-shirts is actively contributing to the financing of global terrorist activity, so in addition to consumers’ health, there is also the broader world impact to consider.”

He also said that counterfeits don’t begin and end with the seller on the street; there is an entire supply chain in operation to create bogus goods and to stem the flow, we need to find the source.

On tackling the counterfeit goods, he said, “Only by following the chain of fake goods all the way up to those producing them and raising awareness of the problem, will we be able to safeguard against the potential dangers posed by counterfeits.”

Source: cosmeticsbusiness.com